ROI & ID

The current buzzword in eLearning & training is ROI or return on investments. The client is most likely to ask you, “Can you tell me the precise ROI from the deliverable?”

Recession blues have hit training budgets. Conversely this is really the best time to train and reskill employees. Workloads are low and time is money. Time invested in training now will mean ROI at a later stage.

Still, ROI is so much on the ID’s platter, that the goal for a training program in say, sales needs to be as specific as:

  • It aims to increase your sales output by 5%.

Or

  • Your employees productivity will go up by 35%.

An insurance manager will need to be assured that his branch will increase its revenues by 20-40%, if his managers complete this training program.

ROI means measurable specific goals. A simple direct communication to your client’s decision makers.

Is giving numbers enough? Back up the numbers by a core strategy. A strategy that will deliver the 20 – 40% output.

A strategy like telling your client that a program with direct transfer of skills such as a a computer based simulation or application training are more likely to benefit their staff then a theory intensive learning program. You will opt for programs which test knowledge on field or in real life scenarios. Simulations allow a near transfer of learning by engaging the user in multi-sensory activity.

Effective performance in simulations will translate to effective performance in the business. Any performance measure criteria that you give in a simulation must be related to similar criteria in the real world. Giving a measurable specific goal will ensure that your training program is going to be that much more meaningful to your learner.

Remember, the evaluation phase will be in the field and will hit your program hard unless you meet the goal.

Keep it real.

Keep it short.

Keep it simple.

&

Focus on ROI.

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